Prime Berth in Twillingate

Hello and welcome to my blog! I’m glad you’re here. It’s week 35 in 2022 and I’m hosting Weekend Coffee Share linkup #85. Come on in for a coffee or tea, and let’s catch up.

Before reaching St. John’s, the capital city of Newfoundland and Labrador, from Western Newfoundland, I passed through many small fishing communities and headed north to the town of Twillingate, located on the Twillingate Islands on the north east coast of Newfoundland.

Twillingate gets its name from the French word “Toulinquet,” given to the islands by French fishermen, who compared it to a group of islands off the French coast near Brest also called Toulinquet. Twillingate is known for icebergs, whales, ocean experiences and outdoor adventures. It was a historic fishing community (since the 1500s), but because of the decline of the fishing industry, its economy now relies more on tourism.

One of the attractions in Twillingate is the Prime Berth Fishing Heritage Centre. It is a private interpretive fishing center and craft studio created by David Boyd, with the support of his wife Christine, as a tribute to his fisher forefathers. Captain Dave also runs boat tours for iceberg viewing and whale watching.

Prime Berth refers to the age old practice of each spring holding a draw, or lottery of sorts, to determine the place, or “berth” where fishermen would set their cod traps during the coming summer. Everyone hoped and prayed that they would be lucky enough to draw the best spot, or “Prime Berth”, as it was called. In David’s case this was personal and special as all the fishermen gathered in his father’s kitchen each May for the annual cod trap draw. In honour of this tradition, and as a tribute to proud people so dear to his heart, David decided to call his heritage centre – “Prime Berth”- meaning literally -“the best spot!”

Prime Berth Fishing Heritage Centre

The following two slideshows highlight some of the displays that I found interesting at Prime Berth. Click on the arrows or swipe to move through the slides.

Buildings and Doors

These brightly painted buildings house fishing artifacts and tools. There are hundreds of items on display in the buildings and on or above the doors. The last picture shows the jaw bone of a fin whale found at Trinity Bay in the 1950s.

Murals

These murals depict life in a fishing community. Look closely to see fish, icebergs, whales, seabirds, boats, clapboard homes, fishermen and women, the ocean and the rocky coastline. The island of Newfoundland is nicknamed “The Rock” because of its rocky terrain and high cliffs.

I hope to take you on an easy walk in a charming and historic town next week.

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Toronto Music Garden in Spring

Hello and welcome to my blog! I’m glad you’re here. It’s week 25 in 2022 and I’m hosting Weekend Coffee Share linkup #75. Come on in for a coffee or tea, and let’s catch up.

This week I welcomed summer arrival in the Northern Hemisphere on June 21. As if on cue, Toronto had a heat event on June 21 and 22 with maximum temperatures reached 33C (91F), and felt like 39C (102F) with humidity. It was sunny and warm the rest of the week.

To pay tribute to a beautiful spring that I had, I’m taking you on an easy stroll in the Toronto Music Garden in spring. Aside from the gorgeous tall trees, let’s see colourful flowers, listen to birdsong, and smell the gentle floral scent.

The Toronto Music Garden springs from the imagination of renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma and garden designer Julie Moir Messervy. Inspired by Johann Sebastian Bach’s First Suite for Unaccompanied Cello, the garden is made up of six “movements” whose forms and feelings correspond to that suggested in the music: Prélude, Allemande, Courante, Sarabande, Menuett, and Gigue.

Click on any image in the gallery to see its bigger version and image name.

1. Prélude

This section imparts the feeling of a flowing river. Granite boulders that came from the Canadian Shield represent a stream bed. Low-growing plants soften its banks. Circular designs on the ground and at the edge of the boulders represent the water movements. The trees with straight trunks are native Hackberry trees. This is the only section in the garden that is not a dance form.

2. Allemande

This section imparts the feeling of a forest grove of wandering trails. The allemande is an ancient German dance. The trails swirl inward and move higher and higher up the hillside. A circle of dawn redwood trees and a small birch forest provide shades to the various contemplative sitting areas that look over the harbour.

3. Courante

This section imparts the feeling of a swirling path through a wildflower meadow. The courante is an exuberant Italian and French dance form. The trails swirl upward in a spiral form, through a lush field of grasses and brightly-coloured perennials that attract bees, birds, and butterflies. At the top of the swirling path is the maypole, with Celtic-patterned spirals and iron wheel, designed by Anne Roberts.

4. Sarabande

This section is envisioned as a poet’s corner with a centerpiece. The sarabande is based on an ancient Spanish dance form. The trails go in an inward-arcing circle that is enclosed by tall needle-leaf evergreen trees. Japanese maple trees are also grown here. The centerpiece is a huge stone that acts as a stage for readings, and holds a small pool with water that reflects the sky.

5. Menuett

This section imparts the feeling of a formal parterre garden of flowers. The menuett is a French dance movement. Its formality and grace are reflected in the symmetry and geometry of a circular pavilion. The pavilion is hand-crafted with ornamental steel by Tom Tollefson. It is designed to shelter small musical ensembles or dance groups.

6. Gigue

Gigue section imparts the feeling of a series of giant grass steps that offer views onto the harbour. The gigue, or “jog”, is an English dance. The steps form a curved amphitheatre that focus on a stone stage set under a weeping willow tree.

In spring, the Toronto Music Garden is a wonderful place to stroll, check out what’s blooming, watch birds, listen to birdsong, and reconnect with nature. Benches are available throughout the garden to sit and enjoy the scenery.

How has your week been?

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5 Colourful Murals To See

Hello and welcome to my blog! I’m glad you’re here. It’s week 24 in 2022 and Weekend Coffee Share linkup #74 is open. Come on in and help yourself to a coffee or tea.

Week 24 in 2022

I’ve been on a few wonderful adventures this week. Initially, I thought of pausing the linkup for one or two weekends when I’m unavailable to put together a post or to host. It turns out I have time to create this short post in advance so here it is.

The Weekend Coffee Share linkup has been going well. There are about thirty participants every weekend. Thank you for your active participation and supportive comments. Even though I have limited time for blogging this week, I’ll reply to your comments as soon as possible.

5 Colourful Murals

Aside from taking many nature walks in spring, I’ve also done art walks and have many mural images to share. Nature inspires me and I’m drawn to art with natural elements. Take a look at these five murals in downtown Toronto. They were created by accomplished artists who have done many murals in Toronto and internationally.

The first three murals were on Bell utility boxes. Bell is Canada’s largest communications company. The Bell Box Murals have transformed utility cabinets into works of art.

Bird mural by Jarus
Bird mural by artist Jarus, 2019
Flower mural by Jon McTavish
Flower mural by artist Jon McTavish, 2019
Flower mural by Jon McTavish
Flower mural by artist Jon McTavish, 2019
Owl mural at Saint George hotel by birdO.
Owl mural by artist birdO (also known as Jerry Rugg), 2018
Rise of the Pollinator mural by Nick Sweetman, 2016
Rise of the Pollinator mural by artist Nick Sweetman, 2016

In the last picture, in the top right corner of the mural, the tree (unfortunately) covers the pollinator above the hibiscus. This mural is amazing to see in real life. Nick Sweetman, the artist, has done many murals to raise awareness about the importance of pollinators, bees and butterflies.

Which mural is your favourite?

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Goodbye Winter, Hello Spring 2022

Hello and welcome to Weekend Coffee Share #62! I’m glad you’re here. Please come on in, help yourself to a cup of coffee, or tea, or hot chocolate at my coffee station and let’s chat.

Week 12/ 52

Spring arrived on Sunday March 20th in the Northern Hemisphere. I was ready to say goodbye to winter and hello to spring. On Monday, the daytime high temperature was about 14C (58F) and sunny.

A sunny spring day was the perfect opportunity to visit the 7th annual Winter Stations outdoor art installations at Woodbine Beach before the exhibits end on March 31st.

Lifeguard chair at Woodbine Beach.
Lifeguard chair at Woodbine Beach

Goodbye Winter 2022

Winter Stations began in 2015 as a way to highlight the beauty of Toronto’s east end beaches and make them a destination point for outdoor art installations during the winter. The artworks are set up at the lifeguard stations along Woodbine Beach, and each year an international competition receives entries connected to that year’s Winter Stations’ theme.

The theme for this year was Resilience. I’m sharing my pictures of the five winning designs for 2022. For each design, I included lake view and city view.

Click on the arrows or swipe to see the slides.

If you’d like to read the Station description, click on its name on the following list:

  1. S’winter Station – Design Team: Ryerson University’s Department of Architectural Science, Canada.
  2. The Hive – Design Team: Kathleen Dogantzis and Will Cuthbert, Canada.
  3. Introspection – Design Team: University of Toronto’s John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design, Canada.
  4. Enter-Face – Design Team: MELT – Cemre Onerturk and Ege Cakir, Turkey.
  5. One Canada – Design Team: University of Guelph’s School of Environmental Design and Rural Development, Canada.

It was a beautiful day at Woodbine Beach where I said goodbye to winter. I love that even though Toronto is an urban centre, it has several Blue Flag beaches like Woodbine Beach. To see interesting public art on the beach is the icing on the cake.

Hello Spring 2022

Speaking of Resilience, on Tuesday, another sunny day, I spotted several early spring flowers in the public gardens. They have survived the cold winter months and bloomed amid the dead leaves. Seeing them made me so happy.

Hello snowdrops, hellebores, and a variety of crocus flowers! Welcome back. Even though winter still seems to linger, spring will take over. I look forward to seeing more lovely flowers in the coming days.

Click on the arrows or swipe to see the slides.

Your Turn:

  1. Which Winter Station is your favourite?
  2. What signs of Spring (or Fall in the Southern Hemisphere) have you seen?
  3. How has your week been?

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These B/W Murals Revive History

Hello and welcome to Weekend Coffee Share #61! I’m glad you’re here. Please come on in, help yourself to a cup of coffee, or tea, or hot chocolate at my coffee station and let’s chat.

Week 11/ 52

On Sunday March 13th, Daylight Savings Time began in Toronto. Clocks were turned forward one hour so you may notice a change in when the Weekend Coffee Share linkup started today.

I took a leisure bike ride and a stroll in Little Italy neighbourhood to revisit six amazing black and white murals. They are on the side of the Revival nightclub on Shaw Street (at College Street). I first saw them in Fall 2021 when the artist was painting them.

Murals at The Revival

The owners of the Revival nightclub wanted to showcase how the area looked before it was built up between the sixties and seventies. Several bridges in this area have disappeared throughout history in Toronto. Toronto artist John Nobrega used photos of the bridges from the archives and painted their images on the side of the Revival.

The first mural is of the landscape of Garrison Creek, a ravine in the early 1900s, which is behind the Revival on College Street.

Landscape of Garrison Creek in the early 1900s.
#1 – Landscape of Garrison Creek in the early 1900s.

The second mural shows the construction of the Crawford street bridge which was built in 1915 over Garrison Creek. This bridge was buried up to the road deck during the sixties.

The Crawford street bridge under construction in the early 1900s.
#2 – The Crawford street bridge under construction in the early 1900s.

The third mural shows an unnamed wooden pedestrian bridge that used to stand in Trinity Bellwoods, and is no longer there.

An unnamed wooden pedestrian bridge that was in Trinity Bellwoods.
#3 – An unnamed wooden pedestrian bridge that was in Trinity Bellwoods.

The fourth mural is the Harbord street bridge. This bridge was neighbours with the Crawford street bridge, also passing over Garrison Creek.

The Harbord street bridge.
#4 – The Harbord street bridge.

The fifth mural shows a similar scene from the wooden pedestrian bridge in Trinity Bellwoods, in the winter, with people tobogganing.

People tobogganing near the unnamed pedestrian bridge.
#5 – People tobogganing near the unnamed pedestrian bridge.

The sixth and last mural is the Crawford street bridge when it was fully constructed.

The Crawford street bridge.
#6 – The Crawford street bridge.

There are more paintings on the arched windows above the six bridge murals. They show construction men at work. Click on the arrows to see the slides below.

Having read the history plaques around Garrison Creek and being familiar with the area, I greatly appreciate how the Revival owners have brought back images of the bridges.

I’m in awe of John Nobrega’s paintings and their amazing details. I was astonished to learn that each of the murals took him merely around two days. I hope my pictures show the beauty of his artworks.

What do you think?

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Visoleil, moonGARDEN and Dreaming

Hello and welcome to Weekend Coffee Share #60! I’m glad you’re here. Please come on in, help yourself to a cup of coffee, or tea, or hot chocolate at my coffee station and let’s chat.

Week 10/ 52

A lovely evening outing gave me an opportunity to photograph three modern art installations in downtown Toronto. Here they are in pictures with excerpts from their information boards.

1. Visoleil

Visoleil sculpture, 2021.
Visoleil sculpture by CIBC SQUARE and Delos Labs, 2021.

Sunlight has great potential to impact our well-being and the circadian rhythm by which we operate. Visoleil, designed by CIBC SQUARE in conjunction with Delos Labs, is a light-emitting public sculpture that simulates natural sunlight to help alleviate the negative effects caused by lack of bright light during the harsh winter months.

The 8 ft circular sculpture generates full spectrum bright light that may help improve circadian rhythm alignment, alertness, and mood by suppressing melatonin and stimulating serotonin production, helping to give observers an energized start to their day.

Visoleil at CIBC SQUARE

2. moonGARDEN

moonGARDEN traveling art installation includes a set of five giant illuminated spheres. The spheres range from six to twelve feet in height, and are filled with immersive animated shadow theatre designs. It was created by Montreal-based design firm Lucion in 2012 and has travelled to about 20 cities around the world.

moonGARDEN by Lucion, in Toronto in Winter 2022.
moonGARDEN art installation by Lucion, in Toronto in Winter 2022.

The colours and light brightness of the spheres change as music plays and the animated theatre designs appear. Sometimes all the spheres show the same colour, other times they vary. It’s mesmerizing to watch the changes.

Click on the arrows to see the slides.

Storytelling with shadows originated around 1000 BC in India and China. They were used to tell local legends and caricature current events. They became a symbol of the wishful, subjective fleeting emotions; the antithesis of light and reality.

moonGARDEN’s shadow theatres are used to project an evanescent dreamlike vision. Much like the effect of music, the visual composition evokes a whimsical poetic moment reminiscent of the imagery we mused over as children.

The multiple shades of grey, the quality of the images, the ever changing positions creates abstract mandalas which flavours daydreaming.

Displayed in a cluster of extra large spheres, bathing in a magical soundtrack, the installation underlines the all inclusive nature of the Set Theory.

moonGARDEN – Lucion

3. Dreaming

Spanish sculptor Jaume Plensa created Dreaming in 2017. It was installed in Toronto in September 2020. Created with polyester resin and marble dust, this sculpture is over eight meters high. At first glance, the large and powerful, white sculpture represents a portrait of a young girl with closed eyes.

Dreaming sculpture by Spanish sculptor Jaume Plensa, 2017.
Dreaming sculpture by Jaume Plensa, 2017.

As you walk around it, its look and feel changes depending on where you are standing. From some angles, the head appears giant and somehow soft. From others, it appears tall, long, and angular. The sculptor’s skills and creativity are impressive.

Dreaming and moonGARDEN together.
Dreaming and moonGARDEN together.

These art installations make me think of the sun, the moon, the galaxy and dream of peace on earth.

How has your week been?

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Cycling The Lower Don Trail

Hello and welcome to Weekend Coffee Share #59! I’m glad you’re here. Please come on in, help yourself to a cup of coffee, or tea, or hot chocolate at my coffee station and let’s chat.

Week 9/ 52

The local weather forecast for March looks promising for cycling so I create a short list of cycling routes to explore during the month. Today I’d like to share a recreational trail that I love and a few photos that I took in Fall 2021.

The Lower Don Trail

One of the most well-used recreational trails in Toronto is the Lower Don Trail. The trail runs along the Don River, from Corktown Common to Pottery Road, passing a number of different parks and sights along the way. It’s five kilometres long (3 miles) and is primarily used for cycling, hiking, mountain biking, walking and running.

I love cycling and hiking on the Lower Don Trail and come here as often as I can.

The Lower Don Trail
The Lower Don Trail is nice and quiet during off-peak hours.

Starting from Corktown Common going north, the first kilometre of the trail goes over bridges, under overpasses and near old railway lines. It has a bit of a wild feel to it. I enjoy nature, an array of plants, animals, and sights of the Don River.

At the 3 km mark on the trail, my favourite sight is the Bloor Viaduct, officially known as the Prince Edward Viaduct, built between 1915 and 1918.

Prince Edward Viaduct
Prince Edward Viaduct

The impressive Prince Edward Viaduct crosses the Don River Valley and the Rosedale Ravine, linking Bloor St. with Danforth Ave. Built to designs by architect Edmund Burke between 1915 and 1918, the bridge was originally a controversial project due to its high cost. Because Danforth Avenue was sparsely populated at the time, the viaduct was dubbed ‘the Bridge to Nowhere.” On the recommendation of engineering firm Jacobs and Davies a subway deck was incorporated into the viaduct, a foresight that saved significant time and costs to the construction of the Bloor-Danforth subway line 50 years later.

Source: Prince Edward Viaduct signage
Prince Edward Viaduct and a subway train passing by
Prince Edward Viaduct and a subway train passing by

A short distance north of the Bloor Viaduct is an interesting public art display known as Monsters for Beauty, Permanence and Individuality by Cree artist Duane Linklater.

Monsters for Beauty, Permanence and Individuality, Duane Linklater, 2017
Monsters for Beauty, Permanence and Individuality by Duane Linklater, 2017

It is a series of fourteen cast concrete sculptures that are scattered in a field along the trail like forgotten ruins. The sculptures are cast replicas of gargoyles adorning prominent buildings in downtown Toronto.

Two of 14 cast concrete gargoyle sculptures by artist Duane Linklater
Two of fourteen cast concrete gargoyle sculptures, Duane Linklater, 2017

I love cycling along the Lower Don Trail, then take a walk beside the river’s edge and explore the side trails to see local wildlife on these less used trails.

The Lower Don Trail
The Lower Don Trail
The Don River, looking north
The Don River, looking north
The Don River, looking south
The Don River, looking south

The Lower Don Trail offers a peaceful and scenic outdoor escape with beautiful views, serene sounds of the river, art exhibits, wildlife and access to green spaces. From Pottery Road, the trail connects to more parks and recreational trails.

In the winter, when the Lower Don Trail is snow-covered, I use other available bike paths. The City of Toronto has started making improvements to the Lower Don Trail. I look forward to cycling on the Lower Don Trail again soon.

How has your week been?

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Which Pet Is Your Favourite?

Hello and welcome to Weekend Coffee Share #57! I’m glad you’re here. Please come on in, help yourself to a cup of coffee, or tea, or hot chocolate at my coffee station and let’s chat.

Week 7/ 52

When I read that February 20th is an annual National Love Your Pet Day in Canada and the USA, I knew exactly where to take my blog readers to see my virtual pets. Are you ready to go? I know you are. We’re going to three places to see a few pet murals that I adore.

1. Mural at Coronation Park

Artist Andrea Manica painted these dog murals on a storage building at Coronation Park in 2021. Their expressions make me smile. There is a fenced dog park across the street where we can watch dogs running around, playing, and chasing squirrels.

Dog mural by artist Andrea Manica, 2021
Dog mural by Andrea Manica, 2021
Dog mural by artist Andrea Manica, 2021
Dog mural by Andrea Manica, 2021

2. Mural at College Street Animal Hospital

Artists Viviana Astudillo and Logan Miller created a long animal-inspired mural for the College Street Animal Hospital in 2012 under the StreetARToronto program in partnership with Community Cave. I love the animal eye expressions and their ears. They make me want to pet them.

Pet mural at College Street Animal Hospital
Mural at College Street Animal Hospital, 2012
Mural at College Street Animal Hospital
Close-up of the mural at College Street Animal Hospital

3. Mural at the Toronto Humane Society

Artist Allan Ryan (better known as Uber5000) painted a long and amazing mural that covers most of the south wall of the Toronto Humane Society on Queen Street East (at River Street) in 2017. What could be more appropriate for this wall than cats and dogs and other animals that you can adopt?

Mural at Toronto Humane Society.

Here are my close-up photos of some of the cute animals on the mural. The yellow birds are the artist’s ‘signature’ animal on his murals.

Hamster and yellow birds cover the main door.
Hamster and yellow birds cover the main door
Cat on the grass.
Cat on the grass
Three cats together
Three cats together including the black cat in the middle
Cat with a ball.
Cat with a ball
Turtles with fun sunglasses
Two turtles with fun sunglasses
Rabbit with red glasses
Rabbit with red glasses

Using my cellphone to photograph these murals is my low maintenance way of owning pets. I promise there will be less photos in my next post.

Which pet is your favourite? If you own a pet, tell me what’s most endearing about your pet. How do you show your pet affection?

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Nordic Lights: 6 Dazzling Displays

Hello and welcome to Weekend Coffee Share #56! I’m glad you’re here. Please come on in, help yourself to a cup of coffee, or tea, or hot chocolate at my coffee station and let’s chat.

Week 6/ 52 – Two Announcements

First, I’ve created the Weekend Coffee Share badge for 2022 and added it to the sidebar of my blog. Weekend Coffee Share participants and supporters are welcome to display this badge on their blog.

2022 Weekend Coffee Share badge
2022 Weekend Coffee Share badge

Second, Dan Antion, the blogger behind No Facilities blog and the host of the Thursday Doors photography challenge, has kindly invited me to meet him virtually on Saturday February 12th at the Island View Café. Feel free to follow our lively conversation about blog challenges and more here.

Nordic Lights Festival

My family and I went out one evening to see the outdoor Nordic Lights festival at Harbourfront Centre. It was a dazzling display of Canadian and Nordic light art installations, some with accompanying sounds.

Here are the 6 light art displays with excerpts from Harbourfront Centre information boards.

1. Control No Control by Iregular Media Art Studio, Canada

Control No Control is a big LED cube that reacts to everything that touches it and every movement performed on its surface. Streamlined patterns and generative sound emerge as interaction occurs. Allowing 48 people to participate at the same time, the experience is extremely intuitive, leading to quick audience engagement and prolonged interactions.

2. Equinox by Anastasia Isachsen, Norway

Equinox by Anastasia Isachsen, Norway.

Equinox asks questions about the nature of light and darkness and about the unique moment of equinox when they are in balance. Equinox combines elements of contemporary dance, nu-jazz and graphics to invite the audience into a dynamic, poetic and contemplative experience. 

3. Gorži by Outi Pieski, Finland

In Gorži, waterfalls cascade from the Power Plant building’s windows. The installation by Outi Pieski is inspired by the Sámi spiritual tradition, in which we live in a reciprocal relationship with all living entities. Gorži creates a poetic sight in which clean water flows freely. The voice of Sámi yoik singer Hildá Länsman brings out the feminine power and the spiritual meaning of water.

4. Great Minds by Aleksandra Stratimirovic, Sweden

Great Minds is a dynamic monument that praises the birth of ideas and relates to all creative people. Light work appears in the form of two monumental brains in dialogue, performing active, luminous brainstorming – the unavoidable phase of each creative process – and figuratively using light to emphasize births of unique ideas and sparkling activities of all great minds.

5. Pressure by Hans E. Madsen and Frederik D. Hougs, Denmark

Pressure is a piece consisting of a 300-metre long RGB-LED hose shaped like a doodle wrapped in the construction. Flashes of impulses whip around in the LED doodle and run towards each other while shifting colour and giving the expression of a digitally-stressed doodle.

6. Sense Light Swing by Alexander Lervik, Sweden

Sense Light Swing.

Sense Light Swing is a light fixture that is also a moving, eye-catching work of art. The shape of the fixture comes from a hanging swing for children that creates a spectacular light show as it swings back and forth on its long hanging cords.  

One More…

Neon hearts are on display at Brookfield Toronto properties from November 1, 2021 to February 28, 2022. Each glowing neon light was hand made in Ontario, Canada by Our Glowing Hearts. Here’s how it all started and how to make a neon heart. Happy Valentine’s Day!

Which light art installation is your favourite?

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Toronto Music Garden in Winter

Hello and welcome to Weekend Coffee Share #55! I’m glad you’re here. Please come on in, help yourself to a cup of coffee, or tea, or hot chocolate at my coffee station and let’s chat.

Week 5/52

One of Toronto’s gems is the Toronto Music Garden. I wrote about it here. I love that the garden is open year-round with no entry fee. Its location right by the waterfront and next to Spadina Quay Wetlands also means there are always more plants and urban wildlife to see than what’s already in the garden.

Toronto Music Garden entrance in winter
Toronto Music Garden entrance in winter

This winter I had the pleasure to visit the garden on several occasions, with and without snow. The lack of leaves shows off the beautiful shape of the trees and their branches.

Beautiful tree and its branches.
A beautiful tree and its branches

While walking in the Toronto Music Garden, I discovered four charming birdhouses, watched and listened to many birds. The birds were vocal and quick to hide.

I also watched Danielle Hyde, a multi-disciplinary Indigenous artist, @CoCreation_Art, spray painted a colourful park mural on a storage building at the east end of the garden. The mural reflects the garden surroundings: People, plants, flowers, birds, butterflies, ducks, and water.

North side
North wall
East side
East wall – The door lock is between the two red and purple flowers
South side
South wall – The doors are easier to see at this angle
West side
West wall

I look forward to visiting the Toronto Music Garden again in Spring when many beautiful flowers bloom.

How has your week been?

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