Toronto Music Garden in Autumn

Hello and welcome! I’m glad you’re here. It’s week 47 in 2022 and I’m hosting Weekend Coffee Share (WCS) linkup #97 which includes the Photographing Public Art Challenge (PPAC). Feel free to link your WCS or PPAC post to this post. Come on in for a coffee or tea, and let’s catch up.

I had written about the Toronto Music Garden in Spring (here), Summer (here) and Winter (here). To complete my series, I visited the garden in Autumn (early November). A week after my visit, we had our first dusting of snow.

Toronto Music Garden

The Toronto Music Garden springs from the imagination of renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma and garden designer Julie Moir Messervy. Inspired by Johann Sebastian Bach’s First Suite for Unaccompanied Cello, the garden is made up of six “movements” whose forms and feelings correspond to that suggested in the music: Prélude, Allemande, Courante, Sarabande, Menuett, and Gigue.

Prélude

This section imparts the feeling of a flowing river. Granite boulders that came from the Canadian Shield represent a stream bed. Low-growing plants soften its banks. Circular designs on the ground and at the edge of the boulders represent the water movements. The trees with straight trunks are native Hackberry trees. This is the only section in the garden that is not a dance form.

Prélude in autumn

Allemande

This section imparts the feeling of a forest grove of wandering trails. The allemande is an ancient German dance. The trails swirl inward and move higher and higher up the hillside. A circle of dawn redwood trees and a small birch forest provide shades to the various contemplative sitting areas that look over the harbour.

Allemande in autumn

Courante

This section imparts the feeling of a swirling path through a wildflower meadow. The courante is an exuberant Italian and French dance form. The trails swirl upward in a spiral form, through a lush field of grasses and brightly-coloured perennials that attract bees, birds, and butterflies. At the top of the swirling path is the maypole, with Celtic-patterned spirals and iron wheel, designed by Anne Roberts.

Courante in autumn

Sarabande

This section is envisioned as a poet’s corner with a centerpiece. The sarabande is based on an ancient Spanish dance form. The trails go in an inward-arcing circle that is enclosed by tall needle-leaf evergreen trees. Japanese maple trees are also grown here. The centerpiece is a huge stone that acts as a stage for readings, and holds a small pool with water that reflects the sky.

Sarabande in autumn

Menuet

This section imparts the feeling of a formal parterre garden of flowers. The menuett is a French dance movement. Its formality and grace are reflected in the symmetry and geometry of a circular pavilion. The pavilion is hand-crafted with ornamental steel by Tom Tollefson. It is designed to shelter small musical ensembles or dance groups.

Menuet in autumn

Gigue

Gigue section imparts the feeling of a series of giant grass steps that offer views onto the harbour. The gigue, or “jog”, is an English dance. The steps form a curved amphitheatre that focus on a stone stage set under a weeping willow tree.

Gigue in autumn

Photographing Public Art Challenge

To my delight, as I reached the east end of the Toronto Music Garden, I saw a new mural on an utility box by artist Varvara Nedilska.

Art by Varvara Nedilska, 2022
Art by Varvara Nedilska, 2022

In early November, Toronto Music Garden still had plenty of colours such as pink and white anemones, pink and purple asters, snow berries, holly berries, and more. I love walking through the garden and take in the beauty around me.

December Schedule

Please note the following Weekend Coffee Share linkup schedule:

  • December 2: Linkup #98
  • December 9: Linkup #99
  • December 16: Linkup #100
  • December 23: No linkup
  • December 30: No linkup

I’ll repeat this announcement between now and December 16th since some bloggers don’t participate every week. I’ll be taking a break in the last two weeks of 2022. After the holidays, I’ll resume the Weekend Coffee Share linkup on Friday, January 6, 2023.

How was your week?

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Bay of Fundy: 6 Fun Attractions

Hello and welcome to my blog! I’m glad you’re here. It’s week 46 in 2022 and I’m hosting Weekend Coffee Share linkup #96. Come on in for a coffee or tea, and let’s catch up.

I’m continuing the story of my adventures on the Bay of Fundy in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. I wrote my adventures in three posts. The first post on five Natural Wonders is here and the second post on five Historic Sites is here.

This post is the third and last installment. I enjoyed visiting lighthouses, covered bridges and public art on the Bay of Fundy. Here’s six fun attractions to explore for free.

1. Masstown Market

Masstown Market is located 10 minutes west of Truro, Nova Scotia. Aside from the market, the lighthouse and interpretive centre has four floors to explore, with a lovely view from the top.

2. Five Islands Lighthouse Park

The Five Islands Lighthouse Park is named after five small islands (east to west): Moose, Diamond, Long, Egg and Pinnacle. The Five Islands are collectively one of many geosites between Lower Truro and Cape Chignecto Provincial Park that form the Cliffs of Fundy UNESCO Global Geopark.

The wooden, “pepperpot”-style lighthouse was built at Sand Point in the winter of 1913-1914. It had to be moved back from the shoreline at Sand Point several times due to coastal erosion. It was moved in November 2008 from Sand Point to its new location at the municipal Five Islands Lighthouse Park overlooking the islands.

3. Giant Lobster

The Giant Lobster in Shediac, New Brunswick is a concrete and reinforced steel statue sculpted by Canadian artist Winston Bronnum in 1990. The statue is 11 metres long and 5 metres tall, weighing 90 tonnes.

4. Sawmill Creek Bridge

Sawmill Creek bridge, built in 1905, is the last covered bridge on Highway 114 and one of the 58 covered bridges in New Brunswick. This covered bridge is 33 m (105 ft.) in length.

5. Maud Lewis Replica House

Maud Lewis (1903-1970) is known for her bold and colourful paintings that featured outdoor scenes and animals, inspired by the landscapes of southwest Nova Scotia and painted on everything from Christmas cards to pulp boards.

She has been the subject of Maudie, the 2016 film starring Sally Hawkins and Ethan Hawke. Maud was born in Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia but she lived most of her life with her husband Everett Lewis in Digby County, Nova Scotia.

On the site of where her house stood is now a replica house built by Murray Ross. It is the same size as her original house. The original house has been moved and is on permanent display at the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia in Halifax.

6. Murals

Here’s a gallery of murals with brief captions for your weekend. Click on the top left image to start and use the arrow to move through the gallery.

The last mural, The Tide Flows, was created by Michael Burt and Daniel Burt in 2018 to mark Wolfville’s 125th anniversary as a town. A line of poetry from John Frederic Herbin’s book Marshlands added a focus: “The tide flows seaward as the day expands.”

*****

I enjoyed my adventures in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. Now that I’ve been home for a while, I’m already thinking about my next adventure.

What free fun attraction(s) have you recently visited?

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Loving Life in October 2022

Hello and welcome to my blog! I’m glad you’re here. It’s week 43 in 2022 and I’m hosting Weekend Coffee Share linkup #93. Come on in for a coffee or tea and let’s chat.

It’s the last weekend in October and a good time for me to reflect on my 2022 focus on Health, Home and Leisure. Here’s my monthly update for October.

Health

Fall colours have been stunning this October. I enjoy views of yellow, orange and red leaves and feeling the crisp, cool air when I go cycling and walking. There’s no shortage of interesting places waiting to be explored.

One of the parks that I was thrilled to revisit this month is Tommy Thompson Park. I wrote about it here. I cycled on the Waterfront Trail, passed the brand new Cherry Street South bridge to Cherry Beach and all the way to and through Tommy Thompson Park. It was pure bliss to be surrounded by the sights, sounds, and feels of nature on the trail and at the park on a gorgeous, sunny day.

Home

After an active summer with monthly out-of-town trips, October is the month for me to relax at home with family, reconnect with friends and complete home maintenance tasks.

I enjoyed small gatherings with family and close friends to celebrate birthdays, anniversaries and Thanksgiving. It so happens that the special occasions spread out in October so there is a celebration every week. It was wonderful to catch up on what’s been happening with everyone.

In addition, there was a coffee date with my sister, a 8 km family walk on Toronto Islands, another 8 km urban walk with a friend, and a coffee date with another friend. We visited the Manulife Elevate Global Photography Exhibition in a beautiful garden and the World Press Photo Exhibition 2022 at Brookfield Place.

For the family walk on Toronto Islands, we walked from Hanlan’s Point to Ward’s Island, visiting the beaches and trails in between. It was a gorgeous morning with blue sky, soft white clouds, calm wind, and the water mirrored the scenery.

Leisure

I balanced outdoor physical and social activities with indoor quiet and creative activities. I baked, listened to podcasts and music, read books, sorted my pictures, wrote blog posts, and researched potential travel destinations.

Photographing Public Art – In August 2012, a group of twenty three emerging youth artists and volunteers created an amazing 80 foot long mural from beautiful tiles and grout, under the artistic guidance of artist Cristina Delago.

Here is the Shore Stories mosaic mural located by the Toronto’s Ferry Terminal exit. Enjoy the following images and if you have 6 minutes and 20 seconds, watch this YouTube video on how the mural was created.

Toronto Harbour and ferry mosaics
Shore Stories mosaic mural

Writing – I’ve included the links for October’s posts in case you missed any and want to catch up:

Overall

I’m grateful to have special occasions to look forward to and enjoy with family and friends throughout a beautiful October. I hope to share the first post on my adventures on the Bay of Fundy next week.

Happy November!

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5 Colourful Murals To See

Hello and welcome to my blog! I’m glad you’re here. It’s week 24 in 2022 and Weekend Coffee Share linkup #74 is open. Come on in and help yourself to a coffee or tea.

Week 24 in 2022

I’ve been on a few wonderful adventures this week. Initially, I thought of pausing the linkup for one or two weekends when I’m unavailable to put together a post or to host. It turns out I have time to create this short post in advance so here it is.

The Weekend Coffee Share linkup has been going well. There are about thirty participants every weekend. Thank you for your active participation and supportive comments. Even though I have limited time for blogging this week, I’ll reply to your comments as soon as possible.

5 Colourful Murals

Aside from taking many nature walks in spring, I’ve also done art walks and have many mural images to share. Nature inspires me and I’m drawn to art with natural elements. Take a look at these five murals in downtown Toronto. They were created by accomplished artists who have done many murals in Toronto and internationally.

The first three murals were on Bell utility boxes. Bell is Canada’s largest communications company. The Bell Box Murals have transformed utility cabinets into works of art.

Bird mural by Jarus
Bird mural by artist Jarus, 2019
Flower mural by Jon McTavish
Flower mural by artist Jon McTavish, 2019
Flower mural by Jon McTavish
Flower mural by artist Jon McTavish, 2019
Owl mural at Saint George hotel by birdO.
Owl mural by artist birdO (also known as Jerry Rugg), 2018
Rise of the Pollinator mural by Nick Sweetman, 2016
Rise of the Pollinator mural by artist Nick Sweetman, 2016

In the last picture, in the top right corner of the mural, the tree (unfortunately) covers the pollinator above the hibiscus. This mural is amazing to see in real life. Nick Sweetman, the artist, has done many murals to raise awareness about the importance of pollinators, bees and butterflies.

Which mural is your favourite?

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5 Easy Walks To Cool Off

Hello and welcome to my blog! I’m glad you’re here. It’s week 22 in 2022 and I’m hosting Weekend Coffee Share linkup #72. Come on in for a coffee or tea and let’s chat.

It’s been a week of hot and humid weather from Monday to Wednesday. Toronto hit a record-breaking high of 32.1 C (89.8F) on Tuesday. It felt more like 36C (97F) with humidity. Cooler air arrived on Wednesday night. Trees are full of green leaves, flowers are blooming and pollinators are busy.

I cycled to the waterfront for a fresh lake breeze and walked in the morning when it was cooler. Here are some pictures from the two parks, two beaches and a courtyard that I explored.

1. David Crombie Park

David Crombie Park is located in the St. Lawrence neighbourhood in the east end of downtown Toronto. The park is named after the former Mayor of Toronto who served from 1972 to 1978 and oversaw the creation of the St. Lawrence neighbourhood.

It’s a long park with plenty of tree shades. At the east end, there is a wall with two murals on its two sides. The murals, with nature and community themes, were painted by artists Shalak Attack and Bruno Smoky (also known as Los Clandestinos) in 2014.

Mural by Los Clandestinos
One side has a circular stage for performances.
Mural by Los Clandestinos
The other side is a basketball court.

2. Sugar Beach

A few blocks south of David Crombie Park is Sugar Beach with white chairs under pink umbrellas, a tree-lined promenade and beautiful lake views. In May, bright daffodils and tulips were planted along the bike path and sidewalks. It’s a nice place to relax and enjoy a sunny day.

3. Sunnyside Park

Sunnyside Park is located in the west end of Toronto on the shore of Lake Ontario. The park has big trees, grassy fields, picnic tables, a nice 3 km (1.9 miles) long boardwalk, and benches facing Humber Bay.

Sunnyside park
Sunnyside park
Sunnyside beach
Lovely tree-framed lake views

4. Sunnyside Beach

Running parallel with the park is Sunnyside Beach, a wonderful spot to cool off on warm days. Walking on the beach, on a clear day, one can see the CN Tower to the east and the white Humber Bay Arch bridge to the west.

Sunnyside Beach looking east
Sunnyside Beach looking west

5. Sunnyside Pavilion Courtyard

Steps from the beach is Sunnyside Pavilion Café which has a lakefront patio and a charming courtyard behind the iron gate. The small garden complete with a fountain was designed by landscape architect, artist and horticulturist H. Stephen Went (1952-1989).

Sunnyside Pavilion garden
Garden
Sunnyside Pavilion fountain
Courtyard with fountain

Sunnyside park and beach are blissful places to enjoy nature and stay cool. I cycled home feeling healthy and content.

How has your week been?

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These B/W Murals Revive History

Hello and welcome to Weekend Coffee Share #61! I’m glad you’re here. Please come on in, help yourself to a cup of coffee, or tea, or hot chocolate at my coffee station and let’s chat.

Week 11/ 52

On Sunday March 13th, Daylight Savings Time began in Toronto. Clocks were turned forward one hour so you may notice a change in when the Weekend Coffee Share linkup started today.

I took a leisure bike ride and a stroll in Little Italy neighbourhood to revisit six amazing black and white murals. They are on the side of the Revival nightclub on Shaw Street (at College Street). I first saw them in Fall 2021 when the artist was painting them.

Murals at The Revival

The owners of the Revival nightclub wanted to showcase how the area looked before it was built up between the sixties and seventies. Several bridges in this area have disappeared throughout history in Toronto. Toronto artist John Nobrega used photos of the bridges from the archives and painted their images on the side of the Revival.

The first mural is of the landscape of Garrison Creek, a ravine in the early 1900s, which is behind the Revival on College Street.

Landscape of Garrison Creek in the early 1900s.
#1 – Landscape of Garrison Creek in the early 1900s.

The second mural shows the construction of the Crawford street bridge which was built in 1915 over Garrison Creek. This bridge was buried up to the road deck during the sixties.

The Crawford street bridge under construction in the early 1900s.
#2 – The Crawford street bridge under construction in the early 1900s.

The third mural shows an unnamed wooden pedestrian bridge that used to stand in Trinity Bellwoods, and is no longer there.

An unnamed wooden pedestrian bridge that was in Trinity Bellwoods.
#3 – An unnamed wooden pedestrian bridge that was in Trinity Bellwoods.

The fourth mural is the Harbord street bridge. This bridge was neighbours with the Crawford street bridge, also passing over Garrison Creek.

The Harbord street bridge.
#4 – The Harbord street bridge.

The fifth mural shows a similar scene from the wooden pedestrian bridge in Trinity Bellwoods, in the winter, with people tobogganing.

People tobogganing near the unnamed pedestrian bridge.
#5 – People tobogganing near the unnamed pedestrian bridge.

The sixth and last mural is the Crawford street bridge when it was fully constructed.

The Crawford street bridge.
#6 – The Crawford street bridge.

There are more paintings on the arched windows above the six bridge murals. They show construction men at work. Click on the arrows to see the slides below.

Having read the history plaques around Garrison Creek and being familiar with the area, I greatly appreciate how the Revival owners have brought back images of the bridges.

I’m in awe of John Nobrega’s paintings and their amazing details. I was astonished to learn that each of the murals took him merely around two days. I hope my pictures show the beauty of his artworks.

What do you think?

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Which Pet Is Your Favourite?

Hello and welcome to Weekend Coffee Share #57! I’m glad you’re here. Please come on in, help yourself to a cup of coffee, or tea, or hot chocolate at my coffee station and let’s chat.

Week 7/ 52

When I read that February 20th is an annual National Love Your Pet Day in Canada and the USA, I knew exactly where to take my blog readers to see my virtual pets. Are you ready to go? I know you are. We’re going to three places to see a few pet murals that I adore.

1. Mural at Coronation Park

Artist Andrea Manica painted these dog murals on a storage building at Coronation Park in 2021. Their expressions make me smile. There is a fenced dog park across the street where we can watch dogs running around, playing, and chasing squirrels.

Dog mural by artist Andrea Manica, 2021
Dog mural by Andrea Manica, 2021
Dog mural by artist Andrea Manica, 2021
Dog mural by Andrea Manica, 2021

2. Mural at College Street Animal Hospital

Artists Viviana Astudillo and Logan Miller created a long animal-inspired mural for the College Street Animal Hospital in 2012 under the StreetARToronto program in partnership with Community Cave. I love the animal eye expressions and their ears. They make me want to pet them.

Pet mural at College Street Animal Hospital
Mural at College Street Animal Hospital, 2012
Mural at College Street Animal Hospital
Close-up of the mural at College Street Animal Hospital

3. Mural at the Toronto Humane Society

Artist Allan Ryan (better known as Uber5000) painted a long and amazing mural that covers most of the south wall of the Toronto Humane Society on Queen Street East (at River Street) in 2017. What could be more appropriate for this wall than cats and dogs and other animals that you can adopt?

Mural at Toronto Humane Society.

Here are my close-up photos of some of the cute animals on the mural. The yellow birds are the artist’s ‘signature’ animal on his murals.

Hamster and yellow birds cover the main door.
Hamster and yellow birds cover the main door
Cat on the grass.
Cat on the grass
Three cats together
Three cats together including the black cat in the middle
Cat with a ball.
Cat with a ball
Turtles with fun sunglasses
Two turtles with fun sunglasses
Rabbit with red glasses
Rabbit with red glasses

Using my cellphone to photograph these murals is my low maintenance way of owning pets. I promise there will be less photos in my next post.

Which pet is your favourite? If you own a pet, tell me what’s most endearing about your pet. How do you show your pet affection?

Shared with #CellPicSunday, #PPAC36, #SundayStills, #ThursdayDoors.

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Toronto Music Garden in Winter

Hello and welcome to Weekend Coffee Share #55! I’m glad you’re here. Please come on in, help yourself to a cup of coffee, or tea, or hot chocolate at my coffee station and let’s chat.

Week 5/52

One of Toronto’s gems is the Toronto Music Garden. I wrote about it here. I love that the garden is open year-round with no entry fee. Its location right by the waterfront and next to Spadina Quay Wetlands also means there are always more plants and urban wildlife to see than what’s already in the garden.

Toronto Music Garden entrance in winter
Toronto Music Garden entrance in winter

This winter I had the pleasure to visit the garden on several occasions, with and without snow. The lack of leaves shows off the beautiful shape of the trees and their branches.

Beautiful tree and its branches.
A beautiful tree and its branches

While walking in the Toronto Music Garden, I discovered four charming birdhouses, watched and listened to many birds. The birds were vocal and quick to hide.

I also watched Danielle Hyde, a multi-disciplinary Indigenous artist, @CoCreation_Art, spray painted a colourful park mural on a storage building at the east end of the garden. The mural reflects the garden surroundings: People, plants, flowers, birds, butterflies, ducks, and water.

North side
North wall
East side
East wall – The door lock is between the two red and purple flowers
South side
South wall – The doors are easier to see at this angle
West side
West wall

I look forward to visiting the Toronto Music Garden again in Spring when many beautiful flowers bloom.

How has your week been?

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Murals at Marilyn Bell Park

Hello and welcome to Weekend Coffee Share #53! I’m glad you’re here. Please come on in, help yourself to a cup of coffee, or tea, or hot chocolate at my coffee station and let’s chat.

Week 3/ 52

I hope you’ve had a good third week of January. From Sunday night through to Monday afternoon, a winter storm brought about 33 cm (13 inches) of snow to downtown Toronto. From Tuesday on, it’s been back to normal winter conditions.

Last week I shared dinosaur and whale murals at Budapest Park. Today I’d like to share three beautiful murals at Marilyn Bell Park and Lakeshore Boulevard Parklands. Their vibrant colours would catch your attention.

The murals were painted on rectangular storage buildings by professional artists. The storage buildings with locked doors look like utility sheds or tool sheds for Parks employees to store their tools for park maintenance. They vary in size. Each has four sides so it’s actually four murals per storage building.

Bee and Butterfly Murals

The Bee and Butterfly murals are on two storage buildings located side by side at east end of Marilyn Bell Park. Two artists painted them with a theme of plants and pollinators.

  • Artist: Katrina Canedo @Kat_Cee painted the bigger and more colourful building.
Butterfly mural
South wall – Butterfly mural on locked doors with artist’s name at the top right corner
Bee on flower mural
North wall – Bee on flower
Flower and leaves
East wall – Flower and leaves
Flowers and leaves
South West corner shows flowers and leaves on the West wall
  • Artist: Hanna Brasly or Bee Fawn @bee_fawn painted the smaller building with the white background.
Honeycomb on locked doors
South wall – Honeycomb on locked doors
Bee and honeycomb
North wall – Bee and honeycomb
East wall – Plants with flowers
Plants with flowers
West wall – Plants with flowers and artist’s signature

Cyborg Mural

This mural makes a bold statement. The longer I study the four sides, the more I admire the artwork.

  • Artist: Gabriel Kizmet @Kizmet32
  • Mural location: Lakeshore Boulevard Parklands, west of Marilyn Bell Park
Cyborg hand painted on a locked door
North wall – Cyborg hand painted on a locked door
Cyborg eye
South wall – Cyborg eye
Cyborg head
East wall – Cyborg head
Cyborg mural
West wall – Cyborg mural

Marilyn Bell Park and Lakeshore Boulevard Parklands are beautiful parks with lots of green space, big trees, picnic tables, tennis courts, a disc golf course, a boardwalk, and fantastic views of Lake Ontario. These vibrant murals bring art and add visual interests to the parks.

Which mural is your favourite?

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Murals at Budapest Park

Hello and welcome to Weekend Coffee Share #52! I’m glad you’re here. Please come on in, help yourself to a cup of coffee, or tea, or hot chocolate at my coffee station and let’s chat.

Week 2/ 52

I hope you’ve had a good second week in January. Today I’d like to share some beautiful public art with you.

There is a string of nice parks along Toronto’s waterfront. Back in Fall 2021, I discovered colourful murals in some of these parks. The murals were painted on rectangular storage buildings by professional artists. I watched one artist painting over several days to complete her murals.

The storage buildings with locked doors look like utility sheds or tool sheds for Parks employees to store their tools for park maintenance. They vary in size. Each has four sides and the paintings are all different so it’s actually four murals per building.

Here are the murals on three storage buildings in Budapest Park at 1575 Lake Shore Blvd West.

Dinosaur Murals

  • Location: West end of Budapest Park
  • Artist: Morgan Groombridge @ Miss Morgan Illustration
  • These fun murals seem to illustrate a dinosaur life cycle: Birth, Youth, Maturity and Death
Dinosaur eggs on door
West wall – Dinosaur eggs on door.
Young dinosaurs at play
South wall – Young dinosaurs at play.
A T-Rex, a Stegosaurus and a young dinosaur.
North wall – Roar! A T-Rex, a Stegosaurus and a young dinosaur.
Dinosaur skull
East wall – Dinosaur skull in a crystal cave.

Little Dinosaur Murals

  • Location: Budapest Park playground
  • Artist: Kseniya Tsoy @al.fergani
Little Dinosaur mural on door
South wall – Door with a pink dinosaur paddling.
Purple dinosaur on roller blades.
East wall – Purple dinosaur on roller blades.
Blue dinosaur with ball and headset.
North wall – Blue dinosaur with ball and headset.
Purple dinosaur paints and green dinosaur on a scooter.
West wall – Purple dinosaur paints and green dinosaur on a scooter.

Whale/ Deep Blue Murals

  • Location: East end of Budapest Park
  • Artist: Rene (or Ren) Lonechild
East side - Whale on doors
East wall – Whale on doors.
West side
West wall
North side
North wall
South side - Medicine Wheel symbol
South wall with Medicine Wheel symbol

The Medicine Wheel symbol is an emblem of North American Indigenous cultural values, tradition and spirituality. Its four colours symbolize:

  • Yellow: spring, time of renewal
  • Red: summer, time of youth
  • Black: fall, time of maturity
  • White: winter, time of death

Budapest Park is a very nice park with big trees, picnic tables, a playground, and a long boardwalk along the shore of Lake Ontario. These murals add more beauty and visual interests to the park.

Which mural is your favourite?

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